Blogtrotters

Showing posts with label [masinko]. Show all posts
Showing posts with label [masinko]. Show all posts

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Either/Orchestra - Live at Berklee [usa+eth]











Founded in 1985 by saxophonist & composer Russ Gershon, the ten-piece Either/Orchestra, based in Somerville MA, is one of the jazz world's most long-lived and distinguished groups.  Alumni include jazz stars such as John Medeski, Matt Wilson, Miguel Zenon, Jaleel Shaw & Josh Roseman.

The E/O, featuring a six piece horn section, piano, bass, drums and congas, has put its stamp on just about every style of jazz, from big band, swing and bop to Latin jazz, electric and avant-garde.  The last decade or more has found the band absorbing an Afro-Caribbean influence through a succession of Latino members.  






Teshome Mitiku with Either/Orchestra




More unusually, the E/O has become deeply involved with Ethiopian music, touring there and collaborating with many Ethiopian greats of the outstanding 1960's generation.  Mulatu Astatke, Mahmoud Ahmed and Teshome Mitiku are among the band's favorites.  The Ethiopian connection includes the double CD Ethiopíques 20: Live in Addis and the DVD Ethiogroove: Mahmoud Ahmed and Either/Orchestra.


Over the years, the E/O has been recognized with five Boston Music Awards, perennial placement in the Big Band category of the Down Beat International Critics Poll, and leader Gershon was nominated for an arranging Grammy for his composition "Bennie Moten's Weird Nightmare," included in The Calculus of Pleasure.








The E/O began performing original arrangements of Ethiopian songs, inspired by a compilation called Ethiopian Groove: the Golden 70s. In 2000, after three of these songs appeared on the album More Beautiful than Death, Francis Falceto, the producer of Ethiopian Groove, contacted Gershon and eventually arranged an invitation for the E/O to play at the Ethiopian Music Festival in Addis Ababa in 2004. 

Along with Indo-British singer Susheela Raman the same year, the E/O was the first non-Ethiopian artist to appear in the festival, and was the first US big band to appear in Ethiopia since Duke Ellington's in 1973. Their concert at the festival was recorded and ultimately appeared in Falceto's Ethiopiques series on the French Buda Musique label. Five Ethiopian guests appear on the recording: Mulatu Astatke, Getatchew Mekurya, Tsedenia Markos, Bahta Hewet and Michael Belayneh. This tour and recording have led to an ongoing collaboration with Astatke, the primary founder of Ethiopian jazz, concerts with Ethiopian expatriates singer Hana Shenkute, krar player Minale Dagnew, masinko player Setegn Atanaw, and the great Ethiopian singer Mahmoud Ahmed with whom E/O released a DVD in 2007. 

Mahmoud Ahmed and fellow legendary Ethiopian singer Alemayehu Eshete played Lincoln Center Out of Doors in 2008 backed by E/O. The group debuted a collaboration with vocalist Teshome Mitiku in the summer of 2010, including a headlining appearance at the Chicago Jazz Festival.



Either Orchestra - 01 - Introduction (3:03)
Either Orchestra - 02 - Tigrigna,Oromigna,Guragigna (14:06)
Either Orchestra - 03 - Arehibi (9:34)
Either Orchestra - 04 - Ethiopia (5:20)
Either Orchestra - 05 - Yamnaw Bedele (6:55)
Either Orchestra - 06 - Yeqir Beqa (6:07)



guests :

Minnale Danew - krar
Setegn Atanaw - masinko
Hana Shenkute - vocal



Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Damakase - Gunfan Yellem! [2016] [ethiopia]











       Endris Hassen (The Ex, Ethiocolor, Imperial Tiger Orchestra, Nile Project, MistO-MistO etc) and Cory Seznec (Groanbox, Seznec Bros, solo, MistO-MistO, etc) joined forces in late 2014 to fuse sounds from east and west Africa. Hungry for a fuller sound, they brought in Misale Legesse (Ethiocolor, Addis Acoustic Project, etc) on kebero and Cass Horsfall on bass (Black Jesus Experience, Jazmaris, etc) to flesh things out and create Damakase, a name which comes from a plant used in traditional medicine in Ethiopia to heal "gunfan" (cold/flu) and other ailments. 
       By late 2015 they had enough songs for an album, and asked Kenny Allen to come in as producer. 









       Gunfan Yellem! (translated roughly as Fever No More!) is an album recorded live in Cory's Glasshouse Studios. 

      Guest artists were invited to add a little spice here and there, and Kenny fine tuned and tweaked the mix to perfection. 


      The music is comprised of 6 originals and two covers (Wuba by the Eritrean composer Tewelde Redda, and Mother's Love by the Ethiopian pianist Emahoy Tsegue-Maryam Guebrou).





Damakase - Tizita Gourd





Damakase - 01 - Wuba (4:09)
Damakase - 02 - Tizita Gourd (4:20)
Damakase - 03 - Wassorai Asho Mada (4:21)
Damakase - 04 - Mother's Love (4:27)
Damakase - 05 - Batten Down the Hatches (4:01)
Damakase - 06 - Southern Bound (5:18)
Damakase - 07 - Tizu Konjo Wusha (3:16)
Damakase - 08 - Damakase (3:29)











Damakase is: 

Cass Horsfall - bass, vocals 
Cory Seznec - guitars, ngoni, banjos, vocals 
Endris Hassen - masenqo, vocals 
Misale Legesse - kebero, percussion, vocals 



Guests: 

Kaethe Hostetter - violin 
Mesele Asmamaw - krar 
Mesfin "Baby" Shiferaw - vocals 
Ralf Werner - cello 
Yann Seznec - piano, pump organ






Sunday, October 15, 2017

Shewankochew, Shibabaw, Egziabher - Love songs from Ethiopia [1997]





   R   E   U   P   L   O   A   D   




   Christian Ethiopians living in the central north: the Tigre, Amhara, Gojjam, Begemdir and Simen, and the Shewa; the rest of the country, the plateau to the south, is occupied by the Galla tribes. The western frontiers of the country are populated by the Shanqella, the east is dominated by Moslem peoples (the Danakil, Issa and Somali), and the south by various populations regrouped under the term Gurage.

   The musical traditions of Ethiopia reflect this diversity: Christian religious music, sung and danced by priests accompanied by drums and sistrums; the Jewish religious music of the Beta Israel ; the secular music of the Amhara and Tigre Christians; the religious and secular music of the Galla Moslems; and the innumerable vocal and instrumental forms of the southern populations. These traditions are not isolated, and they have tended to mutually influence each other.


   Parallel to the classical poetry which sung at court or in the halls of the lords, a more colorful tradition developed, namely that of the azmari minstrels. This poetry in a more simple style is sung in Amharic or in Tigre.

The verses, often improvised or suggested by others, in which may be found abundance of metaphors and double meaning, but also irony and sarcasm, are most often accompanied on the masinqo bowed lute.

   The voice, used in service to the texts, is displayed over a relatively wide range. Ornamentation and vibrato, voice timbre which becomes brassy in dramatic moments, the use of pentatonic scales: all these techniques clearly illustrate the relationship of this music to the Nilotic world. In addition, a strong and very ancient influence of Arabic culture is detectable, especially obvious in the occurrence of non-tempered intervals.




                        Fantahun Shewankochew - vocals and krar lyra
                        Ejigayehu "Gigi" Shibabaw - vocals
                        Wores G. Egziabher - masinqo bowed lute & vocals






                                             
  front cover




                                              
back cover


















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Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Ketema Mekonnen - Ketema 70's [ethiopia]













Ketema Mekonnen - Tizita






Ketema Mekonnen - 01 - Ambasel [with Massinko] (3:38)
Ketema Mekonnen - 02 - Ambasel [with Kirar] (4:40)
Ketema Mekonnen - 03 - Arada (3:28)
Ketema Mekonnen - 04 - Bati (2:53)
Ketema Mekonnen - 05 - Bemela Besebeb (3:09)
Ketema Mekonnen - 06 - Derbaba (3:21)
Ketema Mekonnen - 07 - Endegena (3:05)
Ketema Mekonnen - 08 - Ene Eshaleshalehu (2:40)
Ketema Mekonnen - 09 - Ere Endemin Alesh (1:05)
Ketema Mekonnen - 10 - Gedaye Gedaye (3:25)
Ketema Mekonnen - 11 - Layne Rakshebigne (3:23)
Ketema Mekonnen - 12 - Shemonmoanaye Wa (3:41)
Ketema Mekonnen - 13 - Tey Geday (3:17)
Ketema Mekonnen - 14 - Tizita [with Acordion] (3:54)
Ketema Mekonnen - 15 - Tizita [with Kirar] (3:18)
Ketema Mekonnen - 16 - Tizita [with Massinko] (6:43)





Saturday, June 17, 2017

Endalkachew Yeneahun - Wo Tnekatna [2016] [ethiopia]














Endalkachew Yenehun - Abay Mado





Endalkachew Yeneahun - 01 - Balageru Belugn (4:35)
Endalkachew Yeneahun - 02 - Wa Tenekatena (5:35)
Endalkachew Yeneahun - 03 - Gojjam (4:22)
Endalkachew Yeneahun - 04 - Abay Mado (5:15)
Endalkachew Yeneahun - 05 - Yeabesha Lij Negn (5:44)
Endalkachew Yeneahun - 06 - Tegwaze Tegwaze (5:43)
Endalkachew Yeneahun - 07 - Yalefew Amet (8:09)
Endalkachew Yeneahun - 08 - Ethiopian Annd Yaderege (6:19)
Endalkachew Yeneahun - 09 - Menjar (6:04)
Endalkachew Yeneahun - 10 - Woyne (5:24)



Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Enana Dubale - Cora Cora [2000] [ethiopia]











       Singer Enana Dubale was born in Gonder region. She descended from a family that has a line of famous traditional singer who took music seriously as a profession. Enana joined the proud family tradition early in singing cultural Amharic songs accompanied by a male “Masinko” (a string instrument resembling cello) player. She was doing this entertainment business moving from one refreshment spot to the other. Although the experience is hard there is no doubt that through the process she acquired as excellent voice control develop an ability of having a deeper breath.

       Enana is one of the groups of five singers collectively known by their mothers name “Ergoye” consisting of her their 3 sisters and a brother.

      This group of five came to the notice of the larger due to an album released under the name “Ergoyewoch”.

    She became well known by the public due to the song “Chir Sil Alwedim” and later her other individual album “Cora Cora” was a hit that definatly placed her among the best known young talents.







Enana Dubale - Almaze




            
            Enana Dubale, the member of the famous Ethiopian singers ` The Dubale families`` A.k.a " the five Ergoyes" died in august 2014.  

             Known for her collaboration with Artist Abebe Befekadu in the traditional song “Gomlalaye”, Enana has been receiving treatment at a hospital in Addis before she passed away. Sources said, the late Enana was working on her new album. The 35 years old Enana Dubale released a total of five albums including collaboration with her family members. Enana is survived by her three kids.





Enana Dubale - 01 - Gojam Yegenagnale (4:02)
Enana Dubale - 02 - Kebiraraw Gondere (5:59)
Enana Dubale - 03 - Ahun Ahunima (4:44)
Enana Dubale - 04 - Hedkulih (5:15)
Enana Dubale - 05 - Cora Cora (4:22)
Enana Dubale - 06 - Almaze Atebelegn Dar Dar (4:40)
Enana Dubale - 07 - Atebelegn Dar Dar (5:07)
Enana Dubale - 08 - Hulem Na (6:42)
Enana Dubale - 09 - Sewedih Wededuh (5:14)
Enana Dubale - 10 - Siwer Sew (4:24)
Enana Dubale - 11 - Enes Bagere (5:42)





Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Damtew Ayele - Welo [ethiopia]














Damtew Ayele - Endew Tinbualel




Damtew Ayele - 01 - Welo (4:36)
Damtew Ayele - 02 - Gomlele (5:05)
Damtew Ayele - 03 - Eyerusalem (5:12)
Damtew Ayele - 04 - Korkurew Fersu (5:30)
Damtew Ayele - 05 - Dera Meru (7:53)
Damtew Ayele - 06 - Hagerewa Menjar (6:46)
Damtew Ayele - 07 - Keawedemaw (6:44)
Damtew Ayele - 08 - Enate Nabeyneh (5:10)
Damtew Ayele - 09 - Menale Gojam (5:48)
Damtew Ayele - 10 - Belay Endegena (7:32)




Monday, January 16, 2017

v.a. - Krar & Masinko [ethiopia]











Krar Collective




       The krar or kraar is a five- or six-stringed bowl-shaped lyre from Eritrea and Ethiopia. The instrument is tuned to a pentatonic scale. A modern krar may be amplified, much in the same way as an electric guitar or violin.


        A chordophone, the krar is usually decorated with wood, cloth and beads. Its five or six strings determine the available pitches. The instrument's tone depends on the musician's playing technique: bowing, strumming or plucking. If plucked, the instrument will produce a soft tone. Strumming, on the other hand, will yield a harmonious pulsation. The instrument is often played by musician-singers called azmari. It usually accompanies love songs and secular songs.











Masinko tutorial




        The masinko (also spelled mesenqo, mesenko, mesenko, mesinko, or mesinqo) is a single-stringed bowed lute commonly found in the musical traditions of Ethiopia and Eritrea. As with the krar, this instrument is used by Ethiopian minstrels called azmaris ("singer" in Amharic) . Although it functions in a purely accompaniment capacity in songs, the masinko requires considerable virtuosity, as azmaris accompany themselves while singing.


     The square- or diamond-shaped resonator is made of four small wooden boards glued together, then covered with a stretched parchment or rawhide. The single string is typically made of horse hair, and passes over a bridge. The instrument is tuned by means of a large tuning peg to fit the range of the singer's voice. It may be bowed by either the right or left hand, and the non-bow hand sits lightly on top of the upper part of the string.






01 - Derbe Zenebe - Esti leguaz (5:18)
02 - Maritu Legesse - Akale Webe (4:50)
03 - Gash Abera Mola - Yameral Agere (5:17)
04 - Samuel Kassa - Techno Be'Masinko (3:27)
05 - Gigi & Yeshi Demelash - Bati [Reggaetopia - single] (5:59)
06 - Mahmoud Ahmed & Gossaye Tesfaye - Adera (5:52)
07 - Eskedar Amsalu - Bayeshelegn (7:15)
08 - Rasselas - Tizita (ft. Bezuayehu Demissie) (4:11)
09 - Gigi - Tew Maneh (4:54)
10 - Gigi - Kiraren Bikagnew (5:37)
11 - Asnaketch Worku - Arada (3:01)
12 - Mary Armeday - Enem Lefelefkugn Melageruw Sema (3:39)
13 - Mahmoud Ahmed - Anchiye Hodiye (4:36)
14 - Endris - Masinko (2:36)





Monday, December 5, 2016

Chalachew Ashenafi - Ye-zemed Neger [ethiopia]












Chalachew Ashenafi - Gonder Welkait Tegede





Chalachew Ashenafi - 01 - Aya Belew (7:13)
Chalachew Ashenafi - 02 - Atenchi Bayne Lay (4:37)
Chalachew Ashenafi - 03 - Fekiresh Welelaw (6:42)
Chalachew Ashenafi - 04 - Ye-Abay Derewa Loga (5:32)
Chalachew Ashenafi - 05 - Bewala Bewala (5:30)
Chalachew Ashenafi - 06 - Anchi woye (7:22)
Chalachew Ashenafi - 07 - Ene Gonebes Biye (9:34)
Chalachew Ashenafi - 08 - Ere Endemin Alesh (6:26)
Chalachew Ashenafi - 09 - Menjar (6:45)
Chalachew Ashenafi - 10 - Yetebarek (5:16)




Thursday, October 13, 2016

Ertibu 'Solomon' Agegnehu - Zagol [2011] [ethiopia]











       Born in Shashemene but originating from Bahir Dar, Eritbu (Solomon) Agegnehu’s heritage is of the rich tradition of Azmari. He began singing and playing masinqo under the tutorage of his father Agegnehu Askenaw, a well-known and accomplished Azmari. Eritbu moved to Addis Ababa at the age of 19 in pursuit of his musical dreams, creating a name for himself as an Azmari, performer and artist.





Eritbu "Solomon" Agegnehu - Wayne Wayne




         His first album release was 2011’s "Zagol", which included the singles "Borena" and "Yeawi Lig". This was followed soon afterward by “Woyne Woyne”, which was and still is a big hit throughout Ethiopia. The following year he released the fusion single and accompanying video clip “Seyba Seyba” with bassist and producer Cassawarrior and later released “Wondome Hoy”, in which he sings of the respect deserved to women.




      


   One of Eritbu’s driving ambitions is to return live instrumentation to the ears of the Ethiopian people, as well as to engage in fresh collaborations with international artists. 




His performance history includes shows at Selam Festival, tours with Black Jesus Experience, a support show with Gigi, as well as collaborations with Badume Band, Magabo and Meklit Handro.






    His latest album release “Besentu?” is further evidence of Eritbu’s development in character, technique and sound.









Ertibu 'Solomon' Agegnehu - 01 - Gerado (5:50)
Ertibu 'Solomon' Agegnehu - 02 - Ney Ney Bemela (5:20)
Ertibu 'Solomon' Agegnehu - 03 - Aguremereme (4:09)
Ertibu 'Solomon' Agegnehu - 04 - Borena (5:21)
Ertibu 'Solomon' Agegnehu - 05 - Minjar (5:50)
Ertibu 'Solomon' Agegnehu - 06 - Gonder (5:28)
Ertibu 'Solomon' Agegnehu - 07 - Beza (5:44)
Ertibu 'Solomon' Agegnehu - 08 - Zagol (5:13)
Ertibu 'Solomon' Agegnehu - 09 - Chemboa (4:56)
Ertibu 'Solomon' Agegnehu - 10 - Abet Firhat (5:15)
Ertibu 'Solomon' Agegnehu - 11 - Ney Ney Mewdede (6:01)